DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storage

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Posted by4 years ago
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Hey, first for 1 last update 2020/07/15 post so be gentle.Hey, first post so be gentle.

DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storagehow to DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storage for I decided to give my SO a homemade photoalbum/storybook. I've crafted the spine from a white birch, and the front and back from some wood I had laying around. The wood is whole, and is probably made of norwegian spruce or scots pine. The cover is almost done, and I'm trying to find a way to attach the signatures to the cover but I'm coming up short on ideas. Any of you guys have any for 1 last update 2020/07/15 suggestions?I decided to give my SO a homemade photoalbum/storybook. I've crafted the spine from a white birch, and the front and back from some wood I had laying around. The wood is whole, and is probably made of norwegian spruce or scots pine. The cover is almost done, and I'm trying to find a way to attach the signatures to the cover but I'm coming up short on ideas. Any of you guys have any suggestions?

http://imgur.com/gallery/E6yq6

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DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storagehow to DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storage for
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7 pointsDIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storagehow to DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storage for · DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storagehow to DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storage for 4 years ago for 1 last update 2020/07/15 · · edited 4 years ago

Sorry to tell you this, but you have some real serious issues to deal with here, and I'm not sure they can be solved with those boards and spine pieces. There is no easy and polite way to say some of these things, so I'll just blast through and hope some of this makes sense. I know this is your first post and I'm not trying to be jerk, but I am going to have to say some critical things about your design and what is wrong with it. Sorry in advance.

First, the book casing is an integral part of the hinge design, but here you are just trying to case in three pieces of wood without having any forethought on how it is to be done. The time to think about hinging your cover is before you start the book, because you need to do certain things to have your text block be ready to take the covers.

Here's a major problem, your boards are incredibly massive, and no matter what hinging method you employ, the board weights will cause the cover to fall apart very quickly. Looking at how thick they are, I'm not even sure they will allow the book to be opened and functional. I've probably restored thousands of books in my career and I've never seen any boards that size. It's mind boggling to me. Sorry, it just is. For a bookbinder, looking at your boards is a WTF moment. They are just way too big.

All cover boards need hinge attachments on both the inside and outside usually to have some strength. You can drill or gouge some grooves on the inside of the cover boards and glue down the sewing cords if you left enough on them to reach the boards. This will give you the inner hinge. If you are willing to scrap the spine piece, you could glue leather or another linen layer directly to the spine (though a binder would absolutely sew this hinge material through the shoulders with heavy linen thread, and then you could attach that to the inside of the boards (look up breadel binding).

Honestly, I would scrape the spine piece completely and go to a tight back leather spine with the cords grooved and glue down to the board insides, a second hinge material (linen or thin leather) glued to the spine and sewn through the shoulder, then both hinge materials covered with endpapers. if you can look up spring back ledgers, you will see they use this triple hinge design (two inner hinges and the outer cover material). You could finish with a 1/4 leather spine that would form the third and outer hinge part.

DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storagehow to DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storage for The leather spine material would come over and onto the boards creating a 1/4 leather binding. BUT..... this design requires the text block to be rounded and backed with a shoulder depth equal to the cover board depth. You will NEVER be able to do that with those thick boards, and if you have never backed a book before, now is not the time to try to learn it. If you look at very old wood cover bindings (14-15th century) the boards are never thick, typically no more than 3/16", even on very large books, and usually they are beveled down at the hinge side to almost 1/16 inch or less thickness to aid with opening and closing the cover.

You might might have to find a local bookbinder who can round and back that text block for you, but you will have to give him/her new thinner boards so the rounding is done to the right depth and shape and you will lose at least 1/4-3/16" from the inside gutter area.

You could skip the whole leather cover and just go with an exposed set of second cords attaching the front and back cover. If you use colored cords it would look pretty nice. You could drill angled holes on the cover boards then thread the cords into the covers and glue them down on the inside of the cover before applying your endpapers. That would be a very strong cover hinge system and would be capable of handling wood boards. It's actually how most wood covers were attached before modern times.

Honestly, you are looking at some seriously advanced bookbinding skills here to salvage this. You could just abandon the whole wood cover design, convert over to a more traditional binder board cover and do some type of art design for cover material. Your present text block would work just fine with that approach. Sorry for the bad news. I'll be interested to see if anybody else comes up with a solution for you.

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2 points for 1 last update 2020/07/15 · · 4 years ago

Yeah I make journals with wooden covers and just use a plain Coptic stitch to bind it, and they end up looking pretty great, plus they open flat which will really be good for a photo album.

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3 points · 4 the 1 last update 2020/07/15 years ago4 years agoDIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storagehow to DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storage for · edited 4 years ago

Going to echo the first part of /u/madpainter's reply in that this book probably wont function well the way you want it to--that does not mean it has to be scrapped entirely, just that it might need to be altered a bit.

The the 1 last update 2020/07/15 boards, while possibly a bit clunky, aren't so massive as to be useless (byzantine bindings for example occasionally have some relatively massive boards), but the real issue is how your joints and spine are going to function. I'll try to address both issues separately and maybe you can come up with an amalgamation that serves your needs/wants.The boards, while possibly a bit clunky, aren't so massive as to be useless (byzantine bindings for example occasionally have some relatively massive boards), but the real issue is how your joints and spine are going to function. I'll try to address both issues separately and maybe you can come up with an amalgamation that serves your needs/wants.

DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storagehow to DIY Coffee Table Plans With Hidden Storage for First the joints. When the cover boards of a case bound book (a book in which the covers and spine are constructed and then joined together separately from the text block) are opened, they function in many ways as a lever, pulling the first few pages away from the text block and they also try to lift the spine of the text block up away from the case. Most case bindings accommodate this by means of a joint (flexible gap between the boards and the spine) and by having some type of hollow back to the spine, either from non-adhesion of the text spine to the case spine or the construction of a tube hollow. Because of the way your boards are hinged, they are going to try to do 2 things to your book if you go with normal paste downs on those boards: 1) they are going to try to raise the text block away from the spine by a little more than the thickness of the wood boards, and 2) they will also try to rip the text block in half, because of the added width of the spine they create when opened at their hinge points. You can try to compensate for this by doing a z-fold in the paste down near the joint that isn't glued. This little back and forth fold in the paste down should be able to accommodate the added width and pull created by the opening of the covers. It isn't as aesthetically pleasing to some, but would accommodate your method of board attachment to the spine.

The other issue is your spine. Because the cover spine is stiff, unless you have some release to allow the text block of the spine of the book to float and move, you will have a very restricted opening action and the gutter will be very hard to see, particularly in the middle of the text block. You could work on a tube hollow or similar structure-maybe of a durable cloth-to help with this. Another idea would be to do a reverse round. Bill Anthony and Bill Minter did one as part of the University of Iowa model collection. Instead of rounding the spine in a convex shape (e.g. https://gleesongleanings.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/img_1424.jpg) , they went concave and supported it with a piece of wood. You could do something similar for your book and insert a piece of dowel or something.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-U4X_M5rWO9I/T0O7cF2wAaI/AAAAAAAABm8/f_ykNa3L7YI/s1600/Anthony-Concave_Spine_3.jpg

Trial and error is a great teacher and I'd highly encourage you to come up with a good solution that works for you. You might not like the end product even, but the attempts at figuring it out and seeing what works and what doesn't will make you a better binder in the end.

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Created Jul 10, 2011